Will Stone

Will Stone is a KUNR alumnus, having served as a passionate, talented reporter for KUNR for nearly two years before moving in early 2015 to the major Phoenix market at public radio station KJZZ.

An East Coast transplant, he's worked at NPR stations in Philadelphia, New York and Connecticut. He's also interned at the NPR West Headquarters in Los Angeles where he learned from some of the network's best correspondents. Before joining the public radio airwaves, he studied English at a small liberal arts college and covered arts and culture for an alternative newsweekly in Philadelphia.

He's particularly drawn to education, government and environmental reporting, as listeners became aware, he jumped on any story that got him out into the field with a mic in hand.

He enjoyed the Reno outdoors, food and cultural scene, given his liking for  hiking, fish tacos and great American poetry. While KUNR listeners miss his reporting, we're always glad to help prepare, encourage and support successful public radio professionals wherever they go.

See what Will is up to at KJZZ.

The omicron surge is jamming up hospital emergency rooms with patients who are waiting long hours or even days to get a bed.

"We are being absolutely crushed," says Dr. Gabor Kelen, chair of emergency medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Maryland.

Nationwide, daily COVID-19 hospitalizations are up about 33% this week from the week before and more than 155,000 people are hospitalized with COVID-19, well above the record set last winter.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The United States has hit a new pandemic record. There are now more people hospitalized with COVID-19 than at any other point in the pandemic. If you doubt this, visit an emergency room. NPR's Will Stone reports.

The omicron-driven surge has sent COVID-19 hospitalizations skyrocketing across the U.S., reaching a new pandemic high this week with 145,982 patients hospitalized.

This exceeds the previous high recorded in January last year, according to data tracked by the Department of Health and Human Services, from more than 5,400 hospitals in the country.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

When it was discovered, omicron alarmed scientists.

The variant looked wildly different from earlier versions of the coronavirus — and it quickly became clear that these mutations gave omicron an uncanny ability to sidestep our vaccines and spread very rapidly.

But it has taken longer to untangle what, if anything, sets an omicron illness apart from that of its predecessors. And most of all, does this variant cause less severe disease than the variants that have come before it?

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

DAVID GURA, HOST:

In late November, more than 110 people gathered at a crowded Christmas party at a restaurant in Oslo, Norway. Most of the guests were fully vaccinated. One had returned from South Africa just a few days earlier and was unknowingly carrying the omicron variant of SARS-CoV-2.

Ultimately, about 70% of the partygoers were infected.

Scientists who traced this superspreader event concluded it was evidence that omicron was "highly transmissible" among fully vaccinated adults.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

America's hospitals are in bad shape right now — overwhelmed and understaffed — just as the omicron variant of the coronavirus takes hold across the country and Americans begin traveling and socializing for the holidays.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released new figures late Monday showing that the omicron variant now accounts for 73.2% of new coronavirus cases in the U.S.

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SCOTT DETROW, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Almost two years into the pandemic and we have yet another sign of its mark on the country. The U.S. has reached 800,000 deaths from COVID-19.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2022 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

DON GONYEA, HOST:

The first country to really get hit by omicron is South Africa.

Before the new variant took off last month, coronavirus cases there were low – only several hundred per day in mid November.

But by early December, the tally of daily infections had shot up to more than 4,500 — and genomic sequencing shows that omicron is to blame.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

For the first time, people under the age of 18 may soon be eligible for a COVID-19 booster shot in the U.S.

On Tuesday, Pfizer CEO and Chairman Albert Bourla said the vaccine maker had submitted its request to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to expand the emergency use authorization of a booster dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine to include 16- and 17-year-olds.

Federal health officials are urging Americans to shore up their immunity ahead of the winter holidays by getting a COVID-19 booster shot. But not everyone is working with the same defenses when it comes to keeping the virus at bay.

More than 47 million people in the U.S have already caught the coronavirus, at least according to officially recorded numbers. In reality, it's probably many millions more.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

NOEL KING, HOST:

The FDA this morning authorized COVID booster shots for all vaccinated Americans 18 and older. And the CDC, which has the final say, expects its advisers to weigh in on boosters this afternoon. Earlier today, I talked to NPR's Will Stone.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

It's a worrying sign for the U.S. ahead of the holiday travel season: coronavirus infections are rising in more than half of all states. Experts warn this could be the start of an extended winter surge.

The rise is a turnaround after cases had steadily declined from mid September to late October. The country is now averaging more than 83,000 cases a day — about a 14% increase compared to a week ago, and 12% more than two weeks ago.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

A MARTINEZ, HOST:

Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, and low-dose aspirin used to be a go-to drug for trying to prevent a heart attack or stroke. But the advice on this is shifting, NPR's Will Stone reports.

The U.S. has settled into an uneasy, drawn-out exit from the delta surge that took hold over the summer.

For many weeks, declining cases and hospitalizations have offered hope ahead of the holiday season, when Americans travel and spend more time indoors, but progress has stalled recently, with cases rising or plateauing in more than 20 states.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

The number of Americans hospitalized for COVID is now less than half of what it was in early September. That is good news, but it masks some trouble spots, especially in the northern half of the country. NPR's Will Stone reports.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

ASMA KHALID, HOST:

Updated November 2, 2021 at 7:34 AM ET

Millions of Americans can now opt for an extra shot of protection against COVID-19, regardless of which vaccine they initially received.

The criteria for a booster shot can include your age, job, where you live and your underlying health. In most cases, you have to wait until six months after your first two shots. What's more, a booster shot doesn't have to match the first vaccine you had.

When Colin Powell died this week from complications related to COVID-19, it was a shock to many Americans.

Though scientists and federal health officials are adamant that the vaccines work well to protect against hospitalization and death, it's unnerving to hear of fully vaccinated people like Powell, or perhaps your own friends and neighbors, falling severely ill with COVID-19.

So how well do the vaccines work? How serious is the risk of a serious breakthrough infection, one that could land you in the hospital?

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AILSA CHANG, HOST:

With a second pandemic winter approaching, there are promising signs that the worst of the delta surge has run its course, but in America's hospitals — already short-staffed and backlogged from the summer torrent of COVID-19 — the relief may be only short-lived.

Many are staring down a tough stretch of colder months with the threat of a potentially bad influenza season, an influx of patients trying to catch up on delayed care and a depleted workforce that has had little time — if any — to regroup from this latest wave of coronavirus infections.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Pages