Ryan Lucas

Updated January 21, 2022 at 5:51 PM ET

FBI agents on Friday arrested a Texas man for allegedly threatening to kill election and other government officials in Georgia.

Chad Christopher Stark of Leander, Texas, was taken into custody Friday morning after being indicted in the Northern District of Georgia on a single count of making interstate threats.

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The Justice Department unsealed seditious conspiracy charges against the leader of the far-right Oath Keepers group and 10 other people on Thursday, alleging they plotted to disrupt the electoral process at the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 and endangered former Vice President Mike Pence.

Federal authorities arrested Oath Keepers leader Stewart Rhodes in Texas on Thursday morning and also took Edward Vallejo into custody in Arizona. The other nine people had already been accused of some crimes related to the siege on the Capitol last year.

The Justice Department says it is setting up a new domestic terrorism unit to help tackle what officials say is an escalating threat posed by violent extremists.

The announcement was made Tuesday by Matthew Olsen, the head of the department's National Security Division, and comes as the nation faces a constellation of extremist threats on the home front.

It's been one year since a mob of Donald Trump's supporters, armed with everything from pipes and flagpoles to chemical sprays, smashed their way through police lines and into the ornate halls and chambers of the U.S. Capitol.

The deadly assault on Congress, as lawmakers met to certify Joe Biden's election win, temporarily forced them to scramble for safety and disrupted the peaceful transfer of power.

Updated December 21, 2021 at 2:48 PM ET

The House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol has requested that Republican Rep. Scott Perry of Pennsylvania provide information about his involvement in unsuccessfully seeking to install former Department of Justice official Jeffrey Clark as acting attorney general of the United States.

Perry is the first sitting lawmaker that the panel has sought to question.

A Florida man who used a wooden plank and a fire extinguisher to attack police defending the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 has been sentenced to more than five years in prison.

The 63-month sentence for Robert Palmer, handed down by U.S. District Judge Tanya Chutkan, is the longest yet for a defendant in the Capitol riot investigation.

Palmer was indicted on eight counts but pleaded guilty to a single charge of assaulting police with a dangerous weapon. On Jan. 6, he was on the front lines as the pro-Trump mob fought police and ultimately stormed the Capitol.

Updated December 14, 2021 at 6:03 PM ET

The District of Columbia is suing two far-right groups, the Proud Boys and the Oath Keepers, for allegedly conspiring to terrorize the city with the violent attack on the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6.

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The trial of a prominent Harvard University scientist begins today in Boston. The defendant, Charles Lieber, is accused of lying about his ties to China. NPR justice correspondent Ryan Lucas reports.

Updated December 9, 2021 at 8:43 PM ET

A federal appeals court has denied former President Donald Trump's bid to block the release of some of his White House records to the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol.

The unanimous ruling from the three-judge panel on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals upholds a lower court's decision that a tranche of Trump White House records can be provided to the Democratic-led committee.

Updated December 6, 2021 at 5:05 PM ET

The Justice Department on Monday sued Texas over the state's redistricting plans for Texas' congressional delegation and the state legislature, alleging that they put minority voters at a disadvantage.

Families of more than a dozen victims of the 2018 school shooting in Parkland, Fla., have reached a settlement with the Justice Department to resolve their lawsuit over the FBI's failure to act on tips about the gunman.

In a joint court filing Monday, attorneys for the families and the department say they've reached an agreement to settle all the claims at issue in the case.

The document does not include a financial figure, but a person familiar with the talks says it totals around $130 million.

The Justice Department has charged two suspected Iranian hackers for allegedly trying to intimidate American voters ahead of the 2020 U.S. election, including by sending threatening emails and spreading false information.

An indictment unsealed Thursday in New York charges Seyyed Kazemi and Sajjad Kashian with several counts including hacking conspiracy, voter intimidation and transmitting interstate threats.

Steve Bannon, who once served as former President Donald Trump's chief political strategist, is pleading not guilty to federal charges for defying a subpoena from the House committee investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol.

Updated November 17, 2021 at 2:20 PM ET

Jacob Chansley, the self-styled "QAnon shaman" who became one of the faces of the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol after storming the building in a fur headdress with horns, has been sentenced to nearly three and a half years in prison for his role in the riot.

Photographs of a bare-chested Chansley carrying a bullhorn and a spear adorned with the American flag while howling in halls of the Capitol became some of the iconic images of that violent, chaotic day.

Updated November 4, 2021 at 1:07 PM ET

A Russian national who was a key source of information used in the 2016 dossier of allegations about Donald Trump's alleged ties to Russia has been arrested and indicted on accusations that he lied to the FBI.

Igor Danchenko was taken into custody Thursday morning as part of special counsel John Durham's investigation into the origins of the FBI's Trump-Russia probe. Danchenko has been charged with five counts of making false statements.

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The FBI has not recovered the vast majority of secret documents related to nuclear submarines that a U.S. naval engineer is accused of trying to sell to a foreign power, an FBI agent testified Wednesday.

Special Agent Peter Olinits said the FBI also hasn't been able to find the $100,000 in cryptocurrency that it gave the defendants — Jonathan Toebbe, who worked on nuclear propulsion for the Navy, and his wife Diana — as part of the sting operation that led to the Maryland couple's arrest.

Updated October 19, 2021 at 3:35 PM ET

FBI agents executed search warrants Tuesday at properties in Washington, D.C., and in New York City that are linked to the prominent Russian oligarch Oleg Deripaska.

At a stately residence located in Northwest Washington near several embassies, FBI agents could be seen outside, and authorities had cordoned off the property with yellow police tape.

Agents also searched a property in New York, according to two people with knowledge of the matter.

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An interim report from the Senate Judiciary Committee provides the most detailed look yet at former President Donald Trump's attempts to enlist the Justice Department in his efforts to overturn the results of the 2020 election.

The report from the panel's Democratic majority documents the chaotic final weeks of Trump's presidency following his loss to Joe Biden, and how Trump tried to force Justice Department officials to help him keep his grip on power.

Updated October 6, 2021 at 10:50 PM ET

A federal judge has blocked enforcement of Texas' controversial new abortion law, granting an emergency request from the Justice Department.

A federal judge is weighing arguments on the Justice Department's emergency request to block Texas' controversial new abortion law.

Department attorneys and lawyers for the state of Texas made their cases on Friday at a virtual hearing before Judge Robert Pitman of the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas. At stake is the ability of women in the country's second-largest state to get an abortion after about six weeks of pregnancy, a time before which many people don't realize they're pregnant.

The number of murders in the United States jumped by nearly 30% in 2020 compared with the previous year in the largest single-year increase ever recorded in the country, according to official FBI statistics released Monday.

The data shows 21,570 homicides in the U.S. in 2020, which is a staggering 4,901 more than in 2019. The tally makes clear — in concrete terms — just how violent last year was.

Updated September 16, 2021 at 10:27 PM ET

A Washington attorney who specializes in cybersecurity issues has been indicted for allegedly lying to the FBI ahead of the 2016 election in a conversation about possible ties between Donald Trump and Russia.

Michael Sussmann, a former federal prosecutor who had worked at a law firm with longstanding links to the Democratic Party, is the second individual to be charged in special counsel John Durham's investigation into the origins of the FBI's Trump-Russia probe.

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