Emily Feng

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HAINAN, China — Chinese citizens are indignant after an eight-month pregnant woman was refused entry to a hospital because the validity of her COVID-19 test had expired by just two hours.

Xi'an, a city of 13 million residents, has been locked down since Dec. 23, making this China's biggest lockdown since Wuhan was first sealed in 2020. Xi'an has recorded nearly 1,800 cases in the past month — a high number given that Chinese authorities are punished if even a single case pops up in their jurisdiction.

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China has dominated the medal count at the last five consecutive Paralympic Games. Beijing is hosting the next Paralympics this coming March. So why do the country's athletes with disabilities excel? NPR's Emily Feng reports.

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A lot of Chinese cities don't make money through taxation. Instead, they sell land. It's a financial model that's made cities rich. It's also created a lot of debt that China now wants to limit.

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Chinese President Xi Jinping is not among the more than 100 world leaders invited to this week's virtual Summit for Democracy hosted by President Biden. So Beijing held its own democracy dialogue.

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BEIJING – The Chinese ride-hailing platform Didi Chuxing says it will delist from the New York Stock Exchange and instead move to the Hong Kong Stock Exchange after coming under intense Chinese regulatory scrutiny.

The announcement reflects the rapid reversal in the transportation company's fortunes as China goes on a regulatory blitz targeting some of the country's biggest private technology firms.

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BEIJING — Local health workers in some Chinese cities are breaking into people's homes and killing their pets while the owners are in quarantine, prompting outrage online.

In one case, a dog owner named Ms Fu witnessed through her home security camera as people clothed in hazmat suits entered her home and beat her pet corgi to death with iron rods while she was away in a quarantine facility. She tested negative for the coronavirus.

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BEIJING — A lawyer-turned-citizen-journalist in China who posted videos on social media from Wuhan in the early days of the pandemic is on the verge of dying in prison after staging a months-long hunger strike, according to her family and her lawyer.

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BEIJING – Residents left starving inside makeshift quarantine centers fashioned out of shipping containers. Businesses forbidden from selling goods – even online. A baby reportedly tested for COVID 74 times.

BEIJING – In a long, confessional social media post on Tuesday night, a celebrated Chinese athlete described her alleged assault ten years ago at the hands of one of the country's most powerful Communist Party officials at the time, which she says happened while someone stood guard outside the bedroom door.

"I was so scared that afternoon," Peng Shuai wrote in her post on the Chinese social media site Weibo. "I never gave consent, crying the entire time."

Shanghai health authorities say they have tested nearly 34,000 people for the coronavirus in a single night at Shanghai's Disneyland.

On Sunday evening, the city suddenly closed Shanghai Disneyland and banned anyone inside from leaving. It also shut down the metro station that services the theme park. The park said it did so to cooperate with a contact-tracing investigation after a woman who visited the park Saturday later tested positive for the coronavirus in neighboring Jiangxi province.

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XINING, China — The Dongguan Mosque has adopted some very different looks in its nearly 700 years in China's northwestern city of Xining. Built in the style of a Chinese imperial palace, with tiled roofs and no domes, and adorned with Buddhist symbols, the mosque was nearly destroyed by neglect during political tumult in the early 20th century. In the 1990s, authorities replaced the original ceramic tiles on the roof and minarets with green domes.

This year, provincial authorities lopped off those domes.

BEIJING — The window shades are drawn, the air's filled with cigarette smoke and tension. About three dozen people, mostly men, huddle around a table, in silence — all that can be heard is an unmistakable chirp.

It's a cricket fight.

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BEIJING — In 1961, Muhammad's then-teenage parents loaded as many belongings as they could onto yaks and horses, then set off walking toward the snow-tipped Pamir mountains. Their destination: Afghanistan.

They were among hundreds of Uyghurs who have fled northwest China's Xinjiang region to Afghanistan since the 1950s. The Uyghurs, a mostly Muslim Turkic ethnic minority, made the arduous trek along ancient pilgrimage and trade routes to the neighboring country to escape religious and political persecution under the Chinese government.

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Buddhism is becoming very popular in China. It turned one Tibetan Buddhist monastery into a thriving pilgrimage site - that is, until this year when it possibly got too popular. NPR's Emily Fang reports.

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Tensions between China and Taiwan are once again on display. Over the weekend, both celebrated October 10, or the Double Ten anniversary, but for very different reasons. NPR's Emily Feng explains the dueling political narratives.

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Updated October 1, 2021 at 7:31 AM ET

BEIJING — Here is a riddle: China has more than enough power plants to meet electricity demand. So why are local governments having to ration power across the country?

The search for an answer begins with the pandemic.

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