David Schaper

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Updated January 19, 2022 at 5:02 AM ET

Wireless carriers Verizon and AT&T say they will go ahead with plans to switch on high speed 5G service nationwide Wednesday, except near airports and runways, due to worries that high tech radio signals could interfere with navigational systems on some aircraft.

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In Kentucky, searchers continue to go house to house, combing through debris in hopes of finding the more than 100 people still unaccounted for after vicious tornadoes swept through the state on Friday night.

Families and business owners are also beginning to clean up neighborhoods, salvaging the parts of their lives that remain in the wake of a disaster that has left at least 74 people dead.

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Last night, severe weather, including tornadoes, devastated parts of the Midwest and the South. The governor of Kentucky says it's likely that as many as a hundred people could be confirmed to be killed by the storms.

Pam and Barry Van Dyck have been dreaming of leaving behind the snow in Grand Rapids, Mich., and going someplace warm and adventurous for their 50th wedding anniversary, "with zip-lining, snorkeling, rivers in caves, amphibious vehicles and waterslides," Pam Van Dyck says.

Of course, those aren't activities just for them, but for their children and grandchildren too, as the retired couple wants to celebrate a half-century together with their entire family.

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The discovery of the omicron variant of the coronavirus in the U.S. is raising questions about whether it'll be safe to travel for the upcoming holidays, with Christmas just three weeks away.

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A year ago, many of us stayed home or went to small gatherings for turkey, stuffing and Mama Stamberg's cranberry relish, but this year, the wide availability of coronavirus vaccines in the U.S. is making more people feel comfortable flying longer distances for Thanksgiving.

If you're among them, brace yourself for long lines in crowded airports and jam packed flights, because the early pandemic days of half-empty planes are long gone.

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Updated October 26, 2021 at 11:03 AM ET

Many residents of Midwest and Northern states like to joke that there are just two seasons: winter and construction.

While the latter season is about to end and many of the orange barrels and cones will soon go into storage, there's a lot of uncertainty about what projects can break ground next spring.

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Updated September 23, 2021 at 12:44 PM ET

The City of Chicago believes turnabout is fair play.

For years, Texas has been trying to lure businesses away from other states, particularly those with higher taxes. The red state has even run ads promoting its low taxes and light regulations, while criticizing the "tax and spend policies of the liberal leadership" in blue states like California, New York and Illinois.

Updated September 17, 2021 at 1:03 PM ET

A debate is heating up over whether President Biden's sweeping vaccine mandate should be extended to cover those who travel domestically by plane and train.

It's hard to fathom now, but we used to be able to arrive at the airport just minutes before a flight. We'd keep our shoes and coats on as we went through a simple metal detector, and virtually anyone could go right to the gate without a boarding pass or even showing an ID.

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Twenty years ago, you could arrive at an airport at the last minute and walk through a metal detector without taking off your shoes. But that has changed since the September 11 terrorist attacks as airport security evolved to meet new threats.

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