Christopher Intagliata

NPR's Ari Shapiro talks with O. Carter Snead, law professor at Notre Dame, about the legal standing for anti-abortion arguments at the Supreme Court on Wednesday.

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Now we remember a remarkable man and a remarkable scientist. Dr. Sherif Zaki died after an accidental fall at home, days before Thanksgiving. His wife Nadia and their family did not know what to do with the plans they'd made for the week.

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As the climate changes, our seasons are changing, too.

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Every year, Monarch butterflies from all over the Western U.S. migrate to coastal California to escape harsh winter weather. In the 1980s and '90s, more than a million made the trip. Lately, those numbers have fallen.

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Updated November 23, 2021 at 11:02 AM ET

If you've ever seen the Marvel movie Avengers: Infinity War, you probably recall the scene where antagonist Thanos has all the Infinity Stones in his metal glove, and with a snap of his fingers he wipes out half of the population of the universe.

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Thanksgiving is almost here and, perhaps, you're planning to brave the deep fryer.

You've got the oil. You've got the pan. You've got the fire. You should be good to go, right?

But, how do you know the oil is ready?

Researchers in the field of fluid dynamics have a trick – use your ears.

The scientists were inspired by a classic kitchen hack, used to test tempura-frying oil. You wet the pointy end of a wooden chopstick, stick it into the oil, and listen.

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Scientists have found something strange has been happening among sensitive bird species in the Brazilian Amazon in recent years.

Not only were the birds declining in number, but their bodies were also shrinking in size.

"We found that size is not only shrinking for those sensitive species — it was declining for everyone," said researcher Vitek Jirinec of Louisiana State University.

Jirinec's findings are contained in a new study published in the journal Science Advances last Friday.

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Thanksgiving is just 10 days away, and perhaps you're planning to brave the deep fryer this year. Well, there are plenty of examples on YouTube of what not to do, like this frozen turkey disaster.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

UNIDENTIFIED GROUP: Whoa (laughter).

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In recent years, scientists found something strange was happening among sensitive bird species in the Brazilian Amazon. Not only were the birds declining in number, but their bodies were shrinking in size.

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Some songs will just never go away - like this one.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "EVERY BREATH YOU TAKE")

THE POLICE: (Singing) Every breath you take and every move you make.

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Growing up in Miami, Amore Rodriguez got to know a certain radio jingle by heart.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

UNIDENTIFIED SINGER: (Singing in Spanish).

The United States has seen a decline in cases and hospitalizations since the summer's delta surge — but the decline is declining.

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Our next story begins in a place many of us are familiar with - up awake, watching a YouTube video at 3 in the morning. That's where Princeton evolutionary biologist Shane Campbell-Staton found himself a few years ago.

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All right. This next story might sound like an infomercial. The latest invention in cutlery isn't space-age technology or triple-tempered copper-coated German stainless steel. It's just wood.

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Can a name save lives? The city of Seville in Spain is betting it can.

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Yesterday, the mayor announced a new program - the world's first to give official names to severe heat waves.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Wildlife biologist Greg LeClair has been obsessed with amphibians since he was a kid, when one rainy day, a black and yellow spotted salamander stumbled into his driveway in Maine.

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