Bryant Urstadt

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The marriage market is a market. There just aren't any prices. And when you can't put a price tag on something like love, economists have found ways to match people, as Sarah Gonzalez with our Planet Money podcast reports.

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Hello, and Welcome to Planet Money

May 15, 2020

Hello, and Welcome to Planet Money!

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

Editor's note: This is an excerpt of Planet Money's newsletter. You can sign up here.

What do silver dollars, Venmo, and Brexit have in common? They're all on the minds of our listeners.

Today on the show, we take listener questions, and hunt for answers. We try to figure out how Venmo makes money, how the tax system really works, why truckers are buying helicopters in England, and more.

As President Trump sat across the table from Chinese President Xi Jinping at the G20 in Buenos Aires, things seemed to be looking up. Their two governments, which have been embroiled in a trade war for months, were agreeing to a 90-day truce.

After Amazon announced it would open a new office in New York's Long Island City neighborhood, a fight erupted in Planet Money's office. A similar fight is playing out all across the city. Some people think: "Great! This will bring lots of new jobs and investment to New York." Others worry Amazon's presence will raise rents and displace people. Plus, New York gave the company a huge subsidy in the form of tax incentives.

It's confusing times to work at the Federal Reserve. The playbook for steering the economy doesn't work like it used to. So what's changed? We crash a party of central bankers to get some answers.

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