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Last week, we listened to workers who are packing boxes of food at the Capital Area Food Bank in Washington, D.C. Radha Muthiah, the food bank president, described volunteers at a conveyor belt.

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School district lines have become engines of inequity in many states. Not only can they be used to keep children out of a neighborhood's schools, they can also keep a district's wealth in. But with many districts facing severe budget cuts because of the coronavirus pandemic, a new report proposes a radical solution:

As COVID-19 continues to spread across the country, state and local health officials rush to try to detect and contain outbreaks before they get out of control. A key to that is testing, and despite a slow start, testing has increased around the country.

But it's still not always easy to get a test. While many things can affect access to testing, location is an important starting point.

After the death of Ahmaud Arbery, Morning Edition asked for your reactions to the killing in the shape of a poem. The 25-year-old black man was shot and killed by two white men while he was out for a jog in February in Glynn County, Ga.

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There were protesters clashing with police and stopping traffic in Minneapolis last night; this after the death of George Floyd.

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Music students in northeastern Pennsylvania are turning their streets into concert halls.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "ALL MY LOVING")

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON: (Singing) Close your eyes and I'll kiss you. Tomorrow, I'll miss you.

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All right, so the graduation gowns for the class of 2020 may be pushed to the back of closets, but one ER physician's assistant had an idea about what to do with his.

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Demonstrators brought traffic to a halt in south Minneapolis after a black man was killed in police custody on Monday night.

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The race to defeat the coronavirus can be viewed in two very distinct ways. One is based on international cooperation, with a vaccine treated as a "global public good." The other is competitive, a battle between nations that's being described as "vaccine nationalism."

Many are hoping for the former, but are seeing signs of the latter.

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America's new socially distant reality has warped the landscape of the 2020 election.

Candidates aren't out knocking on doors, and U.S. election officials are bracing for a record surge in mail ballots.

But another subtler shift is also occurring — inside people's brains.

Over the past few months, cities have had to deal with tremendous challenges — fighting a pandemic, preserving essential services, protecting their own workers, coping with devastating budget cuts.

One thing local officials didn't have to worry about was traffic, as the pandemic emptied city streets.

But that's about to change.

When NASA astronauts launch from the Kennedy Space Center, it will be the first time humans have blasted off from the U.S. since the end of the space shuttle program in 2011.

The pilot of that final shuttle mission was Doug Hurley, and he's aboard again Wednesday, ready to make history with the launch of SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule.

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On this broadcast of The National Conversation, we'll answer your questions about how the coronavirus is affecting health around the world. An emergency physician will talk about what scientists have learned in the last 10 weeks about the virus and what researchers do and don't know. We'll also hear some of your stories about silver linings found in the pandemic.

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Christian Cooper, a black man, was out birdwatching in Central Park this weekend, and he asked a white woman to put her dog on a leash. And then he shot a video of the dog owner threatening to call the police on him.

Emergency physician Megan Ranney takes listener questions on what medical and scientific community knows about COVID-19, so far.

NPR's politics and economics reporter answers listener questions about what small businesses should be ready for as states slowly reopen their economies.

NPR's politics and economics reporter answers listener questions about what small businesses should be ready for as states slowly reopen their economies.

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NPR's global health and development reporter answers listener questions on how the coronavirus is affecting the world at large.

Updated at 8:45 p.m. ET

More than 20 Republican members of Congress and constituents are suing House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other officials in federal court to block proxy voting, arguing the practice is unconstitutional, according to House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy.

President Trump wants an arena full of tens of thousands of excited Republicans in Charlotte this summer for the party's national convention. But the coronavirus is causing a lot of uncertainty, and North Carolina Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper hasn't been able to make assurances that such a gathering will be possible in August.

Updated at 9:59 p.m. ET

Twitter has placed a fact-checking warning on a pair of tweets issued by President Trump in which he claims without evidence that mail-in ballots are fraudulent.

Twitter's move on Tuesday marks the first time the technology company has sanctioned Trump as criticism mounts about how the president has amplified misinformation to more than 80 million followers on the social media platform.

Trump responded by accusing Twitter of stifling free speech.

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