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A prominent Vietnamese Zen Buddhist monk has died. Thich Nhat Hanh influenced the anti-war movement of the United States and helped make popular the concept of mindfulness in the West. He died at a temple in central Vietnam at the age of 95. Michael Sullivan reports.

Updated January 22, 2022 at 9:01 PM ET

BIG SUR, Calif. — Firefighters on Saturday were battling a wildfire that broke out in the rugged mountains along Big Sur, forcing hundreds of residents on this precarious stretch of the California coast to evacuate and authorities to shut its main roadway.

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We begin this hour with events in Ukraine. Russia has 100,000 troops poised to enter the country, and Secretary of State Blinken says that he has been blunt about how the U.S. would respond if they cross over.

The Venezuelan group C4 Trio has taken the national instrument of their homeland, the four-string cuatro, to new heights. They've recorded seven albums, collaborated with singer Rubén Blades and, in 2019, won two Latin Grammys for their album with salsa singer Luis Enrique, Tiempo al Tiempo.

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Don't try to sweet-talk Olly Alexander.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "SWEET TALKER")

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Families across the country have been feeling the effects of inflation. Steeper housing costs, bigger grocery bills, higher gas prices are forcing them to change habits, stretch budgets or go without. It has been especially challenging for parents.

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President Biden observed his first anniversary in office this week, and he told a two-hour long press conference...

(SOUNDBITE OF PRESS CONFERENCE)

This past summer, Rupali Limaye says she "sort of became the vaccine lady at the pool."

She's a behavioral and social scientist at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, so it made sense that other parents were coming to her for information. Limaye has also spent the past decade studying vaccine hesitancy. In that work, she has come to understand deeply that when someone has doubts, hearing the facts from someone the person knows well can be a powerful force in overcoming those doubts.

President Biden held a nearly two-hour, very wide-ranging news conference Wednesday that, for all its headlines, underscored how external forces shape his presidency as it enters its second year — and none more so than the ongoing pandemic.

He touted accomplishments in his first year, from millions of vaccinations to the passage of massive COVID-19 relief and infrastructure bills.

Biden reflected on his struggles, too, painted a relatively optimistic outlook for the country, laid out how he wants to be president differently going forward, and even admitted mistakes.

What life is like for an 11-year-old

23 hours ago

Avah Lamie feels like the world needs a lot of fixing. She feels it when she thinks about melting glaciers and plastic in the ocean. And lately, she's been feeling it at school.

"We've had some fights at recess, some physical, some just yelling," she says. "It really just — it gets you down sometimes."

The 11-year-old lives in Hartford, a Vermont town of almost 10,000 people near the border with New Hampshire. She's like a lot of kids: She takes dance, likes science and has a little brother. She's in fifth grade at a small public school called Dothan Brook.

An 11-month-old girl was struck by a stray bullet that hit the parked car she was in on a street in the Bronx Wednesday. Last night, two police officers were shot, one fatally, as they checked out a domestic dispute call in Harlem. The suspected gunman also was killed.

These cases, and those of hundreds of others over the past year, have frustrated residents and police alike. They want the gun violence to stop.

You made the sourdough, you built the LEGO castle, you grew the vegetables. Now what?

To help you find your next moment of joy, we asked our readers what creative ideas they've come up with to cultivate happiness, two years into pandemic life. Your answers were unexpected, exciting and showed there's always a way to tap into your curious side and try something new.

To build a new habit that actually sticks, make sure you're having fun.

Say you want to start a gym routine. Just ask yourself: What's the most fun thing I could do at the gym? Maybe it's Zumba; maybe it's spinning while you watch TV — whatever you think is fun.

"Here's what happens," says behavioral scientist Katy Milkman. "The people who choose the fun way to pursue their goal persist longer, because they like it. So maybe you don't get as much out of every workout ... but they come back."

In the late 1960s, archaeologists discovered a set of familiar bones in Ethiopia: a skull bone, a lower jaw, and parts of a torso.

This collection is known as Omo 1, and at 200,000 years old are considered some of the oldest human remains ever unearthed. Now, a new study argues the bones are at least 33,000 years older than originally thought.

This time frame is essential to understanding how humans evolved in Africa, according to Tim White, a professor of integrative biology at the University of California, Berkeley.

The jazz and lounge music world has lost one of its most iconic personalities. Marty Roberts — one half of the married lounge act "Marty & Elayne" died last week, at 89.

For decades, the duo performed five to six nights a week — Marty on drums and vocals, Elayne on piano and flute.

They were fixtures at the Los Angeles bar and restaurant The Dresden Room — with its retro red booths and stiff cocktails — where they played an eclectic mix of jazz standards, original numbers and their own twists on pop hits.

Updated January 22, 2022 at 9:16 PM ET

NORFOLK, Va. — A layer of ice and a blanket of snow covered coastal areas stretching from South Carolina to Virginia on Saturday after a winter weather system brought colder temperatures and precipitation not often seen in the region.

Updated January 21, 2022 at 8:42 PM ET

HANOI, Vietnam — Thich Nhat Hanh, the revered Zen Buddhist monk who helped pioneer the concept of mindfulness in the West and socially engaged Buddhism in the East, has died. He was 95.

A post on the monk's verified Twitter page attributed to The International Plum Village Community of Engaged Buddhism said that Nhat Hanh, known as Thay to his followers, died at Tu Hieu Temple in Hue, Vietnam.

RIO DE JANEIRO — The world-famous Carnival festivities in Rio de Janeiro will be held in late April rather than the final weekend of February, as the number of coronavirus cases in Brazil spikes and the omicron variant spreads across the country.

As the COVID-19 pandemic wears on, for many, the dollar cost of trying to stay safe adds up. Protective masks and COVID tests — though the Biden administration is offering families a limited number for free — cost time to find and money to buy, and we're wondering how these and other COVID safety expenditures are affecting you.

How much are you spending on personal protective equipment each month? Have you had to skimp on other expenses to pay for PPE, testing or other COVID safety expenses? Or does the cost prevent you from keeping yourself as safe as you'd like?

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