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A federal appeals court has dismissed a lawsuit brought by nearly two dozen young people aimed at forcing the federal government to take bolder action on climate change, saying the courts were not the appropriate place to address the issue.

When President Trump's defense team delivers its opening statement in the Senate impeachment trial next week, famed defense attorney Alan Dershowitz will have a starring role.

But in an interview with NPR's Mary Louise Kelly on Friday, he sought to make clear that his involvement is limited to arguing that the two articles of impeachment do not satisfy the constitutional criteria for removing the president from office.

Updated at 11:32 p.m. ET

It costs just $16 to buy a one-way ticket on the Amtrak train from Chicago to Bloomington, Ill., unless you're the two people who use wheelchairs and tried to buy tickets recently. They were told their tickets will cost not $16 — but $25,000.

When Adam Ballard saw what Amtrak wanted to charge, he couldn't believe it.

The Pentagon is updating the way it vets foreign military students in the wake of the deadly shooting at the Pensacola, Fla., Naval Air Station by a Saudi military officer last month, officials announced.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture has proposed new rules for school meals aimed at giving administrators more flexibility in what they serve in school cafeterias around the country each day.

The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear two cases challenging state attempts to penalize Electoral College delegates who fail to vote for the presidential candidate they were pledged to support.

Electoral College delegates are selected by each party, and under state laws, they are pledged to cast their ballots for the candidate who carries the popular vote. But from 1796 to 2016, over 20 presidential elections, 150 electors have not abided by that pledge, according to FairVote, a nonpartisan voting rights advocacy group.

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The U.S. Supreme Court says it will consider whether employers should be allowed to opt out of providing contraceptive coverage to their workers because of moral or religious objections.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

President Trump often tells his supporters he is delivering on his signature campaign promise. Here he is at a rally in Milwaukee this week.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: You're going to have a wall like no other. It's going to be a powerful, terrific wall.

KELLY: That promise comes at a cost. As NPR's John Burnett reports, it is already the most expensive border wall in the world, and the bills keep piling up.

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Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

President Trump often tells his supporters he is delivering on his signature campaign promise. Here he is at a rally in Milwaukee this week.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

PRESIDENT DONALD TRUMP: You're going to have a wall like no other. It's going to be a powerful, terrific wall.

KELLY: That promise comes at a cost. As NPR's John Burnett reports, it is already the most expensive border wall in the world, and the bills keep piling up.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Police have arrested three men in northern Georgia who are suspected of belonging to a violent white supremacist group called The Base, saying that they were plotting to commit murder and that they belonged to a criminal street gang.

They're the second trio of suspected Base members to be arrested this week; the FBI announced Thursday that it arrested three other men in Maryland.

The Pentagon says 11 U.S. service members were injured in Iran's ballistic missile attack on U.S. assets in Iraq last week. The Americans are being treated for concussion symptoms from the blast and are expected to return to duty after a health screening, a Defense Department spokesperson says.

Everyone retires someday.

It's a fact of life — one that folks usually come to terms with in their mid- to late 60s. Unless, of course, you're running for president. Or Clint Eastwood.

There's one man, though, who makes a whippersnapper like Eastwood look like a novice: Bob Vollmer, who, at 102 years old, is only now considering putting his feet up after nearly six decades at Indiana's Department of Natural Resources.

U.S. authorities have seized the domain name of a website that allegedly sold access to billions of usernames, email addresses, passwords and other sensitive information stolen in data breaches.

Now, visitors to the not-so-subtle website – weleakinfo.com — are greeted with a homepage that reads, "This Domain Has Been Seized."

Episode #2003

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What’s next for the impeachment inquiry? We’ll discuss the latest developments and look at new evidence still surfacing.

Guests

John Bresnahan, congressional bureau chief for Politico. (@BresPolitico)

Impeachment heads to the Senate. Democrats debate electability and gender. The U.S. and China strike a deal. The entire Russian government quits. The roundtable is here.

Guests

Kimberly Atkins, senior news correspondent for WBUR. (@KimberlyEAtkins)

Darlene Superville, White House reporter, Associated Press. (@dsupervilleap)

Baseball’s sign-stealing scandal. We look at what’s fair and what’s foul in the state of baseball and sport.

Guests

Jeremy Schaap, host of the ESPN newsmagazines “Outside the Lines” and “E:60.” (@JeremySchaap)

In July, we took a deep look at NPR's coverage of climate change and promised a follow-up once the newsroom had concluded its evaluation of whether changes were needed.

The centerpiece of Andrew Yang’s campaign for the Democratic nomination is what he calls the Freedom Dividend: a payment of $1,000 every month to every adult in America — no strings attached.

To show what it could yield, Yang selected a New Hampshire family to receive a Freedom Dividend during 2019.

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