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Each week, we answer frequently asked questions about life during the coronavirus crisis. If you have a question you'd like us to consider for a future post, email us at goatsandsoda@npr.org with the subject line: "Weekly Coronavirus Questions." See an archive of our FAQs here.

In Greenville, Miss., pop. 27,000, a modern, brightly lit juice bar stands out in the small downtown lined with mostly mom and pop businesses and a few taverns near the town's riverbank casino.

The chorus of friendly, neighborly hellos is a customer favorite, but what's really turning heads is the owner of Kay's Kute Fruit, 30 year-old Kenesha Lewis.

The Philippine government, beset by charges of incompetence and corruption in its handling of the pandemic, has mounted a vaccination campaign that any of its Southeast Asian neighbors might envy. Over the course of just three days this week the country vaccinated 7.6 million people ages 12 and above. 34.53% of the country is now fully vaccinated.

The Portland Trail Blazers have fired Neil Olshey as their general manager, a dismissal that takes effect immediately. Olshey had been under investigation after workers reportedly accused him of creating a hostile work environment.

The Blazers said Olshey violated their code of conduct, in a brief statement the team issued on Friday.

The NBA team didn't provide details of Olshey's misdeeds, stating, "Out of respect for those who candidly participated in that privileged investigation, we will not release or discuss it."

MINNEAPOLIS — A mostly white jury was seated Friday for the trial of a white suburban Minneapolis police officer who said she drew her handgun by mistake when she fatally shot Black motorist Daunte Wright following a traffic stop.

Civil rights attorney Ben Crump is demanding that the FBI take full control over the investigation into the death of Jelani "J.J." Day.

A new study of long COVID-19 finds a disturbing cluster of symptoms well after infection: tremors, vibrations, debilitating pain and mental decline.

Screenwriter Heidi Ferrer died by suicide in the fall after a year-long battle with the symptoms. Her husband Nick Guthe spoke to Here & Now about her battle with the illness.

Friday’s jobs report reveals that 210,000 jobs were added in November. That’s the lowest since December 2020.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd speaks with Ali Velshi, MSNBC anchor and economics correspondent, about the report.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

The Trump-era “Remain in Mexico” policy requires migrants to wait out their asylum claims in Mexico. President Biden ended the program on his first day in office but was forced to reinstate it under a court order.

We get the latest from Aaron Reichlin-Melnick, policy counsel at the American Immigration Council.

In Afghanistan, an escalating economic crisis has brought 23 million people close to starvation — more than half of the country’s population. That’s according to the United Nations, who along with other aid agencies is warning that the already dire situation could become a humanitarian disaster.

And it may become near impossible for those who need health care to receive it because Afghanistan’s economic collapse has pushed the medical system closer and closer to a breaking point.

Amazon debuted its new series “Harlem” on Friday. It’s about four Black women navigating their friendships, careers and love lives.

But does it stand out amid a proliferation of shows in this mold?

NPR TV critic Eric Deggans weighs in.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

President Biden has signed legislation to keep the government funded through Feb. 18, clearing the way for Congress to focus on a daunting year-end to do list.

Congress has less than three weeks to resolve differences that have plagued both parties for the entire year.

We conclude our tribute to Sondheim by listening to archival interviews with collaborators and performers, including Stephen Colbert, James Lapine, Paul Gemignani and Lin-Manuel Miranda.

They're certainly eye-catching, but they're also dangerous: That's the verdict on the "Carolina Squat," a modification to vehicles that raises their front while keeping their rear end low to the ground.

Police in North Carolina are now on the lookout for any squatted cars or trucks, which this week became illegal to drive in the state.

Will audiences return to movie theaters?

3 hours ago

Though movies like “Dune” and “No Time to Die” are opening in movie theaters, attendance is still way down from pre-pandemic levels.

We get an update on that and Alec Baldwin’s ABC interview on the “Rust” incident from KPCC entertainment reporter John Horn.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

The Tyson meatpacking plant has brought thousands of new people to Garden City, Kansas, in the past four decades.

But even as the industry rakes in around $2 billion for the local economy each year, the number of people living in poverty in the rural town has soared.

David Condos of Kansas News Services reports.

Police haven't even issued a final report about the shooting accident that took the life of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins on the set on the Western film Rust. But star Alec Baldwin — who held the gun that fired the deadly bullet – went on national TV on Thursday to answer probing questions about a tragedy that has attracted loads of national attention.

To celebrate the 30th anniversary of World Cafe, we're looking back and posting playlists from each year of the show. As music has evolved over the years, so have our playlists, which have grown to reflect a much wider range of music than when we first set out.

One grandma's mistaken text message is now being adapted into a Netflix feature film.

In 2016, Jamal Hinton, a senior in high school, received a text from a grandmother inviting him over for Thanksgiving dinner.

Hinton quickly figured out it wasn't his grandmother, but grandma Wanda Dench still extended her invitation to the then stranger to come over for Thanksgiving dinner.

Michigan is seeing a spike in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations. New Hampshire, Minnesota, and other states in the Midwest and Northeast are also seeing cases climb.

This surge is the delta variant, which began well before the new variant omicron was detected in the U.S. just this week.

Dr. Angela Rasmussen explains what’s behind the latest surge and what we know — and don’t know — about the omicron variant.

States are currently redrawing voting districts using data from the 2020 census.

Dan Reicher, senior research scholar at the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment and a former assistant secretary of energy, joins us to discuss hydroelectric dams, which provide 7% of the U.S. energy portfolio.

This article was originally published on WBUR.org.

Kids in New Delhi, India, have been indoors for 20 months — first for COVID-19, now for smog beyond four times what’s safe. Officials have installed towers to filter it, but scientists say they don’t work.

NPR’s Lauren Frayer reports.

In southern British Columbia, Canada, the scope of the last few weeks of record-breaking rain, flooding and deadly mudslides there is starting to become more clear.

With washed-out bridges and roads, recovery efforts could take months. And the events are just another example of the dangers of extreme weather events that are becoming worse and more frequent due to climate change.

Here & Now‘s Callum Borchers speaks with CBC News senior reporter Lyndsay Duncombe in Vancouver.

BEIJING – The Chinese ride-hailing platform Didi Chuxing says it will delist from the New York Stock Exchange and instead move to the Hong Kong Stock Exchange after coming under intense Chinese regulatory scrutiny.

The announcement reflects the rapid reversal in the transportation company's fortunes as China goes on a regulatory blitz targeting some of the country's biggest private technology firms.

Updated December 3, 2021 at 4:19 PM ET

Jennifer and James Crumbley, the parents of the 15-year-old accused of murdering four students at a high school in Michigan, have been charged with four counts each of involuntary manslaughter -- an exceptionally rare move the prosecutor said was warranted by laying out a timeline of "egregious" mistakes and missed opportunities to prevent the shooting.

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Changing Our Minds

It's easy to stick to our beliefs and much harder to accept views that contradict them. But psychologist Adam Grant argues that rethinking our ideas is good for us—we might even come to enjoy it.

About Adam Grant

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Changing Our Minds

Former GOP congressman Bob Inglis used to believe climate change wasn't real. But after a candid conversation with his children and a hard look at the evidence, he began to change his mind.

About Bob Inglis

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Changing Our Minds.

How can we have more productive conversations with people we vehemently disagree with? Civil rights activist Loretta J. Ross gives us the tools to call people in — instead of calling them out.

About Loretta J. Ross

About 50 years ago, pianist Stanley Cowell and trumpeter Charles Tolliver embarked on a bold venture together. In the face of a tough business climate, at a time of constriction in the record industry, they started their own label, Strata-East Records, breaking in its catalog with the self-titled debut by their own working band, Music Inc.

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