Public Radio For Eastern North Carolina 89.3 WTEB New Bern 88.5 WZNB New Bern 91.5 WBJD Atlantic Beach 90.3 WKNS Kinston 88.5 WHYC Swan Quarter 89.9 W210CF Greenville
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
0:00 0:00
Available On Air Stations

Greenland's melting ice could be changing our oceans. Just ask the whales

Ryan Kellman
/
NPR

When North Atlantic right whales went missing from waters in the Gulf of Maine, it was a red flag. With only about 340 animals left, the species is at risk of extinction. Many of the whales are swimming hundreds of miles farther to Canadian waters instead, putting them in new danger.

Now, scientists are linking that to deeper shifts in the ocean, brought on by climate change. The connection may reach all the way to the world's second-largest ice sheet, melting increasingly fast on Greenland.

You can read the full story online. Or check out the other stories in the NPR Climate Desk series Beyond the Poles: The far-reaching dangers of melting ice.

This story was edited by Neela Banerjee and Sadie Babits. It was produced by Ryan Kellman. Special thanks to Susan Parks of Syracuse University for the recording of North Atlantic right whales.

Copyright 2023 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Lauren Sommer covers climate change for NPR's Science Desk, from the scientists on the front lines of documenting the warming climate to the way those changes are reshaping communities and ecosystems around the world.